Waterfall Wednesday (1)


Hosted by Tina at Tina’s Book Reviews, Missie at The Unread Reader, Joy & Serena at Edgy Inspirational Romance, Nic at Irresistible Reads and Jenny from Supernatural Snark, each week we’ll be reading and discussing a set of chapters from the book. There will be prizes for participants, so click the button for more information and to sign up!

Discussion Questions for Chapters 1-6

1. Waterfall opens with the introduction of Gabi – she’s depressed, a little angry and is dealing with feelings of loneliness. Are you connecting with her this soon in the novel? Do you see things you like or dislike?

I had a hard time connecting with Gabi at first. She’s really frustrated, which makes her frustrating to read. I also found her impulsive actions a bit selfish – though I think that’s part of who she is as we come to see in the rest of the trilogy. I had a hard time accepting that this daughter of famous archaeologists would be so careless with the tomb, and dragging her sister along for the ride. Let’s just say I was glad the time travel happened so early on before I started to really dislike Gabi.

2. Gabi gets to time travel back to 14th Century Italy – The Dark Ages in its prime. Is there any time in history that fascinates you and would you travel back if you could?

I’ve always been obsessed with 17th century France – Louis XIV, the Sun King; Versailles palace; Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette. In fact, even going into 18th century France, I’m still intrigued. The tearing down of the Bastille, the French Revolution, Napoleon – I love it all. French history fascinates me, and the culture is so proud, artistic, and democratic that I can’t help but love it. Visiting Versailles will go down as one of the best moments in my life, and I’ve never felt more at home than in a country that prides itself on the values of its beloved Tricoloreliberté, egalité, fraternité. In fact, my husband and I are in the midst of planning another visit in March!

3. Most of the men, including Marcello have a very set opinion about a woman’s place. Gabi gets manhandled a bit in these first few chapters, and even gets asked if she’s a witch. The men are shocked when Gabi rides a horse like a man and shimmies down the castle walls. What do you think of men’s mentality back then? Gentlemanly, chauvinistic, simple-minded?

One of the things that I love about Marcello is that despite his shock at Gabi’s conduct, he doesn’t try to change her too much. Yes, he wants to protect her, and I admire that about him, but he doesn’t try to lock her in her room to keep her out of harm’s way. His behavior is very similar to another man-from-another-time, Mr. Jamie Fraser, so I didn’t mind Marcello’s actions at all. It’s a different time, better or worse, and I like that Gabi can remain respectful but independent, and that the men may find her bizarre or forward without taking complete advantage of her or dismissing her as a crazy person.

4. When Gabi becomes a part of this era, the people are immediately intrigued but suspicious of her. Many judge her by her difference. Do you think this is fair? Have you ever been in a situation where you felt like an outsider or that others were misjudging you?

Well, I always feel like an outsider, but that’s due to my innate and intense shyness. It’s hard being the new person in any situation, and I think that’s what makes Gabi stand out. Back then, people didn’t travel far unless they had to, so to see this strange girl all alone, many miles from home, is an oddity. Of course they’re curious about her! Plus she has a funny accent and limited Italian, so she does stick out quite a bit. I think it’s natural for the people to be skeptical and judgmental of her, since she is an outsider in every sense of the word.

5. What do think the coolest thing would be about living in the Dark Ages? What would be the worst?

I think spending time in castles would be pretty awesome. I’ve always wondered what it felt like to be in a castle full of tapestries and fires. Is it comfortable? Is comfort relative? I also think riding around on horses everywhere would be fun. You know, until the saddle sores caught up to me.

To me, the absolute worst would be a lack of plumbing. I like my flushing toilets and running water far too much to want to live without them forever. Oh, and a lack of medicine. Yikes.


Amazingly beautiful and painstakingly crafted signature courtesy of Small Review

Review: Legend by Marie Lu

Book: Legend
Author: Marie Lu
Publisher: Putnam Juvenile
Release date: November 29, 2011
Source: ARC for review from Books with Bite Book Tours

Summary: (from Goodreads) What was once the western United States is now home to the Republic, a nation perpetually at war with its neighbors. Born into an elite family in one of the Republic’s wealthiest districts, fifteen-year-old June is a prodigy being groomed for success in the Republic’s highest military circles. Born into the slums, fifteen-year-old Day is the country’s most wanted criminal. But his motives may not be as malicious as they seem.

From very different worlds, June and Day have no reason to cross paths – until the day June’s brother, Metias, is murdered and Day becomes the prime suspect. Caught in the ultimate game of cat and mouse, Day is in a race for his family’s survival, while June seeks to avenge Metias’s death. But in a shocking turn of events, the two uncover the truth of what has really brought them together, and the sinister lengths their country will go to keep its secrets.

Full of nonstop action, suspense, and romance, this novel is sure to move readers as much as it thrills.

First impressions: Is it enough to say that I knew I’d like this just because it’s a dystopian? From the first few sentences that set up a militaristic, controlling, dystopic future, I was on board with this one.

Lasting impressions: Very few books bring on a full cry from me, but this was one of them. The ending was so full of tension and sacrifice that I couldn’t help but sob, right there at work during my lunch break.

Conflicting impressions: I intended to give this 5 stars after finishing it, but when I sat down to try and write a review, I couldn’t remember what happened or why it made me cry without a bit of a refresher. Considering it’s not as unforgettable a tale as some of my other die-hard 5 star favorites, I knocked it down a peg.

Overall impressions: This is a story about starcrossed lovers. June and Day are two 15 year olds who come from very different backgrounds, but are thrown together by circumstance, only to find themselves falling in love instead of destroying each other. Um, yes please!

June is the smartest kid, with the brightest future, in all of the Republic. She scored a perfect score – twice, since they didn’t believe it the first time around – on her required exams. This landed her on the fast track to a promising military career, following in the footsteps of her older brother, Metias.

Day, on the other hand, failed out of his exams and was sent to the labor camps – or so the Republic would have the people believe. He escaped his terrible fate, and now acts as a Robin Hood of the poor districts where he was raised. He cheats and steals his way into money, giving some back to his destitute family when he can, though all except one of his brothers believes him to be dead. Day is known to wreak havoc on the Republic, making him the most wanted criminal in the country.

When a plague (one of many constantly striking the poor districts) rolls through his family’s neighborhood, Day sets out to find a cure to save his youngest brother, who has been infected. After a dangerous break-in and an incident that leaves Metias dead, June is set on the trail of Day to find and kill him in revenge for the loss of her brother.

If only things were that easy.

Day is a charmer – bold, flirtatious, charismatic – and even June cannot resist being drawn to him. He challenges every preconceived notion the Republic would have her believe about him, and she struggles with how to keep hating him, even as the doubts set in about Metias’s murder. June is likewise intriguing to Day. She is strong, smart, and ruthless, though also gentle of heart. She is quiet, thoughtful, and listens to Day, just when he thought no one was left to care about what he had to say. I loved these two together, and the tension that came from them not truly trusting each other.

The story moves quickly, and it’s very hard to put this one down. None of the mysteries unraveling throughout are big surprises, and I wish the book was a bit longer, if only to get some more background. The Republic (Los Angeles) is at war with the rest of the continent, but I found it unclear why or how it started. I wasn’t sure the exact history of this world or who the real villains were, so it was difficult to get invested in the political allegiances. For this book, June and Day were enough, but in the future I hope we get more information on the conflict that’s brewing around them.

This is a must-read for all dystopian fans, and I think it’s a good jumping in point for anyone looking to try out the genre for the first time. It has an intriguing setting, enjoyable characters, and a lot of heart. I very highly recommend it!

Rating: 4/5 stars

Click the stars for a description of my rating system


Amazingly beautiful and painstakingly crafted signature courtesy of Small Review

Review: Ultraviolet by R. J. Anderson

Book: Ultraviolet
Author: R. J. Anderson
Publisher: Carolrhoda Books
Release date: September 1, 2011
Source: ARC for review from NetGalley

Summary: (from Goodreads) Once upon a time there was a girl who was special.

This is not her story.

Unless you count the part where I killed her.

Sixteen-year-old Alison has been sectioned in a mental institute for teens, having murdered the most perfect and popular girl at school. But the case is a mystery: no body has been found, and Alison’s condition is proving difficult to diagnose. Alison herself can’t explain what happened: one minute she was fighting with Tori — the next she disintegrated. Into nothing. But that’s impossible. Right?

First impressions: Alison has the rare condition of synesthesia. She perceives the world differently than most – tasting emotions, seeing letters in certain colors, and seeing visual representations of sound. Because of this affliction (for lack of a better word), the descriptions from Alison’s point of view are incredibly beautiful. Though she suffers lots of negative consequences from the overstimulation, I still found myself kind of jealous that I don’t see the world the way she does.

Lasting impressions: I was really into this one until the strange new direction the book takes in the last third of the story. I won’t call it a twist, because there were so many unsubtle clues that I could see it coming a mile away, but it definitely was a game-changer for Alison. It didn’t really work for me, and my overall impression of the book suffered as a result.

Conflicting impressions: I wish that Alison’s relationships with her fellow psych ward patients had been developed further. Instead, they get the backseat to the impending drama and so some of the events involving them – roommate changes, some misguided sexual harrassment, and witnessing other breakdowns – seemed misplaced in this story. Either have the story be about the mental ward and give us deeper characterizations for her fellow patients, or don’t develop them at all and leave the focus on Dr. Faraday and the Tori mystery.

Overall impressions: I so wanted to love this book. As it turns out, I did like it, but the ending didn’t gel for me so I ended up with more mixed feelings than anything. Sigh.

Here’s the deal. Alison’s a cool girl. She has a deliciously complicated relationship with her parents. There’s something freaky going on with her classmate, Tori, that is unraveling her life in such a way that when the story opens she’s in a psych ward, uncertain as to whether her memories of killing Tori are correct. The problem is that she remembers disintegrating Tori, which couldn’t be possible. So what really happened?

If this had been the entire focus of the book (which I guess in a way, it is, but not in the way I expected), I would have been happy. We do get resolution as to what happened to Tori and the role Alison played in it, but man did that explanation come out of left field.

As I mentioned above, the explanation isn’t entirely unexpected given the enormous planet-sized hints R. J. Anderson drops throughout the text. I did find myself hoping, however, that the explanation would turn out to be the opposite of my assumptions – with no luck. This made the ending something of a disappointment for me, and because it was so strikingly different in tone and content from the first two-thirds of the book it plummeted my enjoyment of the story.

Alison’s synesthesia is engrossing, and as she starts working with the mysterious researcher Dr. Faraday, we find out more information on how her brain functions. The former psych major in me was completely hooked on the barrage of tests Alison undergoes, and her relationship with Faraday gives her some needed warmth in the midst of the cold and sterile hospital setting.

If you are looking for an unusual paranormal story with a definitely non-formulaic plot, I recommend picking this one up. It’s a worthwhile read, particularly for fans of psychology, or anyone looking for a story a little bit “out there.”

Rating: 3/5 stars

Click the stars for a description of my rating system


Amazingly beautiful and painstakingly crafted signature courtesy of Small Review

Bout of Books Wrap Up

The read-a-thon is just about complete! Thank you to Amanda at On a Book Bender for hosting this fun challenge. I did not make as much progress as I would have liked, but that’s okay. No new books for me I guess.

Here was my planned list:

1) Wisdom’s Kiss by Catherine Gilbert Murdock (review due 9/12)
2) The Iron Thorn by Caitlin Kittredge (library book due back Wednesday) FAIL
I couldn’t finish this before its due date, so I’m picking a new book.
2) Goliath by Scott Westerfeld (although I may have to abandon this one too because Galley Grab is not playing nice with my new Nook)
3) Torrent by Lisa T. Bergren (because why haven’t I read it yet? It’s getting dusty and that is UNACCEPTABLE.)
4) Lover Unbound by J. R. Ward (I’ve started this one and now just need to finish it)
5) To be determined (something spontaneous that I want to read in the moment)

Here’s what I actually read:

1) Lover Unbound by J. R. Ward

This took forever and a day to finish because I just wasn’t feeling it. It didn’t exactly set the tone for the week.

2) Starstruck by Cyn Balog

This was a tour book that arrived mid-week, which I decided to power through this weekend. Very enjoyable!

3) Torrent by Lisa T. Bergren (partial)

I got almost to the midway point today, but I have a lot more reading to do if I want to finish it in time to get the review up on Thursday. GULP.

4) Goliath by Scott Westerfeld (partial)

Here’s the thing about Goliath: my Nook hates it. The beautiful artwork dotted throughout the book causes my Nook to crash out to the home screen, which makes reading it slow going. I read a little on my laptop today, and that’s going to be how I finish it if I want to read it before it releases. At this point, I’m thinking of scratching and just pre-ordering a copy to read when it comes out. I am thoroughly annoyed with my Nook at the moment and it is negatively affecting my enjoyment of this book. Grrr.

So that’s it. Two whole books. That’s basically what I would read anyway, so I’m feeling like a total loser/failure. I also had to drop off the face of the blogging planet this week because I had so much going on, so I didn’t even get to enjoy the Twitter updates or giveaways as much as I had hoped. Woe is me!

I hope all of you fared better than I did. I had a great week trying to get books read, and I did manage to catch up on my reviews. I now have a review completed and scheduled for every book I’ve read, which is a big load off. On to a new week!


Amazingly beautiful and painstakingly crafted signature courtesy of Small Review

TGIF at GReads! (10) & Weekly Recap

This Friday blog hop is run by Ginger at GReads! (who also created this beautiful button). Each week she posts a new question for us to ponder.

Click the button to join in!

This week’s question is:

Book Associations: Which genre, authors, or particular books do you think people associate with your reading style?
Well, I like to think of myself as a fairly eclectic reader, although the focus of this blog is mostly on YA fiction. I would guess most people would associate me with YA or paranormal genre fiction, or maybe even fantasy. I like almost anything with a fantasy element, though I’m not a big epic or high fantasy reader.

I don’t know! This was a hard one. What do you think?

What genres or books do you associate with me? Do you think you have a reading association?


My weekly recap is inspired by the phenomenally talented, kind and generous Small Review. If you are not already following her, you are really missing out. Also, have I mentioned how much I love Cool Text? They’re the folks that allow me to make these cool (and simple) text buttons – for FREE!

If you’re a first time visitor, or just didn’t get the chance to stop by this week, here’s what you missed:

Reviews
BEHEMOTH by Scott Westerfeld
5/5 stars
YA Series Challenge

Events
Bout of Books Read-a-thon
Waterfall Wednesdays
Squeaky Books Birthday Bash Giveaway

Enjoy your weekend everybody!

Amazingly beautiful and painstakingly crafted signature courtesy of Small Review

Squeaky Books Birthday Bash Giveaway!


I’m hosting a contest as part of
Enna Isilee’s Birthday Bash 2011
Presented by Squeaky Books
From August 22nd until September 22nd Enna Isilee at Squeaky Books is having a HUGE bash to celebrate her birthday! Thereâ??s a giveaway nearly EVERY DAY, tons of author interviews, and guest posts from a bunch different YA book bloggers. And I get to host a contest!

I get to give away a copy of Rampant by Diana Peterfreund! Entering is simple, just fill out the form (with optional bonus entries). Sorry, US only. You have until September 21st at 11:59 MST to enter. All winners will be announced on Enna Isilee’s birthday (September 22nd) on Enna Isilee’s blog (Squeaky Books). And today, Ennalee interviewed Diana at Squeaky Books. You should totally go check it out.

Want to know more about Rampant? Click here! I loved this book, so check out my review if you want to see what I had to say about it.

Without further ado, enter to win! Click below.

Click here to enter!


Amazingly beautiful and painstakingly crafted signature courtesy of Small Review

Waterfall Wednesdays are almost here!


We all know what a ridiculous fan I am of Lisa Bergren’s River of Time series. (If not, see my 5 star reviews of Waterfall and Cascade.) So imagine my giddy surprise when I saw the announcement for a weekly read-along of Waterfall!

Hosted by Tina at Tina’s Book Reviews, Missie at The Unread Reader, Joy & Serena at Edgy Inspirational Romance, Nic at Irresistible Reads and Jenny from Supernatural Snark, each week we’ll be reading and discussing a set of chapters from the book. It all starts next week, so hurry up and get your copy if you haven’t already. It’s going to be a blast!

Click the button to sign up at Tina’s Book Reviews, and on that post you can also peek at the discussion questions for next week covering chapters 1-6. Whether it’s your first time reading or your 10th, this gives all of us new and old fans of the River of Time series a chance to dish on why we love those hot Firenze men and the fiery women who love them.

There will be giveaways of books, signed copies, and even a pair of Italian earrings bought by Lisa Bergren herself on a trip this fall! Come and join us! I. Cannot. Wait. In fact, I think the most difficult part of this will be keeping myself within the allotted chapters. 🙂


Amazingly beautiful and painstakingly crafted signature courtesy of Small Review 

Review: Behemoth by Scott Westerfeld

Book: Behemoth
Author: Scott Westerfeld
Publisher: Simon Pulse
Release date: October 5, 2010
Source: Borrowed from local library
Series: Leviathan #2

Summary: (from Goodreads) The behemoth is the fiercest creature in the British navy. It can swallow enemy battleships with one bite. The Darwinists will need it, now that they are at war with the Clanker powers.

Deryn is a girl posing as a boy in the British Air Service, and Alek is the heir to an empire posing as a commoner. Finally together aboard the airship Leviathan, they hope to bring the war to a halt. But when disaster strikes the Leviathan‘s peacekeeping mission, they find themselves alone and hunted in enemy territory.

Alek and Deryn will need great skill, new allies, and brave hearts to face what’s ahead.

First impressions: This series was definitely designed to be read together. The action picks up shortly after the conclusion of the first book, Leviathan, and as with that book, we are quickly launched into exciting events. Westerfeld is a master at drawing you in.

Lasting impressions: I actually read the last 60 or so pages slower than any other section of the book, because I did not want it to end yet. I have so much fun in the world of this series that I get grumpy when I’m forced to stop reading.

Conflicting impressions: Sometimes Alek wavers in TSTL (Too Stupid To Live) territory. The fact that he can’t figure out Deryn is a girl is mind-boggling, especially as her feelings grow toward him. I was just glad that at least one character figured it out, but I think the total is still a bizarrely low 3 people that know or suspect her secret. Really? It’s that easy to impersonate a boy? It’s so easy for Deryn, in fact, that I no longer find that subplot filled with much tension.

Overall impressions: I thought I loved this Clanker/Darwinist world in Leviathan, but this book took it to a completely new stratospheric level. My god is Scott Westerfeld a genius! Everything about the voice, tone, action, setting, and characters pulls together into one cohesive whole that is so vibrant it is nearly cinematic. I can practically breathe in the Turkish air when the lady boffin leads a team to meet the sultan. I can hear the steam pistons firing in the giant walkers. I can smell the stale atmosphere deep in the Leviathan whale-ship’s core. I didn’t just read this book. I The-Neverending-Story-style lived it.

Deryn is still my favorite of the two protagonists, but Alek improved greatly in my esteem this time around. He was more confident and less arrogant, more careful and less reckless. He started to use his brain and consider the wants and needs of not only himself, but his people and the civilized world as well. Deryn, meanwhile, is still tough, humble, and a bit naive. They are great when they work separately, but brilliant when they work together. If only they weren’t on opposite sides of this growing war.

The politics got a bit more jumbled as the hard lines are blurred and more countries start pulling into the conflict. It’s no longer just Europe, but expanding into Asia as well. I found the Turkey setting in this one to be colorful, different, and exciting. Instead of clomping through the Alps or soaring through the skies, we see new communities and cultures and how they are affected by both the Darwinists and the Clankers. Westerfeld handles it all impeccably, and I found myself wanting to plan a trip to Turkey.

Alek and Deryn both are thrust into new levels of responsibility in this book, and we get introduced to a new beastie that should prove to be quite instrumental in the future (though I admit it was a bit of a letdown after all the book one buildup with the eggs). I loved seeing these two kids step up and experience the world in new ways. They really rose to the challenges presented to them and I look forward to seeing how they deal with what’s coming in the final chapter, Goliath, due out September 20th.

This one was full of nearly nonstop action and scheming, with a tiny hint of romance thrown in. I hope we get more than just a taste in the next one, but only because I adore these two so much and am really rooting for them. This is certainly a book that can stand on its own without the romance element, but gets an added touch of that something special when the romance comes into play.

Westerfeld is a beautifully subtle writer, never hitting us over the head with extraneous details or descriptions. Instead, his stories unfold with ever escalating urgency, perfectly timed to the events and consequences the characters face, and propelling the plot forward with just the right balance of character and plot development. Throw in the fantastical steampunk elements (which never outshine or divert from the story), and now I’m glued to the page.

I cannot recommend this series highly enough. As much as I loved the first book, Behemoth has catapulted this series to the top of my favorites list, and I promise you I will be re-reading these books for years to come.

Rating: 5/5 stars

Click the stars for a description of my rating system

Bout of Books Read-a-thon

It’s time for another read-a-thon! After moping over the amount of challenges I have left to complete and feeling entirely overwhelmed by my library stock and review piles, I decided that Amanda’s read-a-thon over at On a Book Bender is exactly what I need.

If you think you need one too, the good news is that it’s going all week long. Personally, I get frustrated by weekday only or weekend only read-a-thons, because it’s too much in a short amount of time. This gives me until Sunday night at 11:59pm to get through some books and feel like I actually accomplished something.

If you’d like to participate, it’s pretty easy. You can click the button at the top of the page to find the sign-up page, and it’s up to you whether you update your progress on your blog, via Twitter, through comments, or at all. Set your own goals, join the Twitter conversation using the hashtag #boutofbooks, or just sign up and enter the giveaways. It’s entirely your choice.

Speaking of giveaways – there will be 10+ giveaways by different bloggers all week long, and mini challenges too! It’s going to be fun, relaxing, and full of awesome people. You can check the list of fellow participants to see who are all the cool kids and maybe even make some new friends.


Logan’s starting line

My personal goals for the week are to get through at least 5 books. I have been burning the candle at both ends lately and my reading has fallen off, so I’m hoping this will be the push I need to find some enjoyment in reading again. With a busy work week facing me, and in-laws descending for the Chicago Triathlon this weekend, I think 5 is a pretty lofty goal, but I’ll give it my best.

I have some review books I have to tackle and I want to read at least one book just for fun. Here’s my planned list:

1) Wisdom’s Kiss by Catherine Gilbert Murdock (review due 9/12)
2) The Iron Thorn by Caitlin Kittredge (library book due back Wednesday) FAIL
I couldn’t finish this before its due date, so I’m picking a new book.
2) Goliath by Scott Westerfeld (although I may have to abandon this one too because Galley Grab is not playing nice with my new Nook)
3) Torrent by Lisa T. Bergren (because why haven’t I read it yet? It’s getting dusty and that is UNACCEPTABLE.)
4) Lover Unbound by J. R. Ward (I’ve started this one and now just need to finish it)
5) To be determined (something spontaneous that I want to read in the moment)

I plan to devote at least one solid hour of reading per night instead of watching TV or blogging or Twitter stalking. This means uninterrupted, guilt-free, distraction-free reading time. It can be on the bed while hubby sleeps, but it is not to be reading done while attempting to multi-task (which is what I do most of the time). I also will be reading, per usual, during my morning and evening commutes and my lunch break. All told, that should equal roughly 15-18 hours, depending on how much I can work in on Saturday and Sunday.

To make it really interesting, I’m going to give myself a little carrot to dangle in front of my nose all week. If I successfully complete all 5 books by Sunday night, I will gift myself a “luxury” book. Now, I buy books a lot, but there are some books I still won’t buy because I consider them investments, or too expensive, or not relevant to blogging and so I guilt myself into not buying them. If I complete this read-a-thon, I give myself permission to buy one of those books.

I will probably update here as I go, but may end up doing it mostly through Twitter. You can find me there at @loganturner. I’ll try to post a short wrap-up post on Sunday.

Ready?……..GO!


Amazingly beautiful and painstakingly crafted signature courtesy of Small Review

TGIF at GReads! (9) & Weekly Recap

This Friday blog hop is run by Ginger at GReads! (who also created this beautiful button). Each week she posts a new question for us to ponder.

Click the button to join in!

This week’s question is:

The Reviews We Don’t Write: Have you ever read a book and not wanted to review it? Are some books too personal that we want to keep our thoughts our own?
I think this happens the most often when I’ve really loved a book, though it can also happen to me when dealing with issues or topics that affect me deeply. I’ve hesitated reading certain books for fear that I won’t be able to adequately review them because of my own personal biases. How much of myself do I want to share here? Does sharing certain events from my past help or hinder my reviews and the people who read them?

As with most art forms, I think it can be hard to explain why you love something. When I see a dance or hear a song that brings tears to my eyes, I don’t know how to say I appreciated it other than “I loved it.” Similarly, with books I often find myself saying, “Well, I loved it because it made me cry.” That evocation of emotion is often its own indicator of a positive opinion. And sometimes, that should be enough, though I strive to be a bit more articulate in my reviews on the blog. 🙂

Do you find some books too personal to review?


My weekly recap is inspired by the phenomenally talented, kind and generous Small Review. If you are not already following her, you are really missing out. Also, have I mentioned how much I love Cool Text? They’re the folks that allow me to make these cool (and simple) text buttons – for FREE!

If you’re a first time visitor, or just didn’t get the chance to stop by this week, here’s what you missed:

Guest Post
Everything’s Better with Lions at Ruby’s Reads

Memes
Waiting on Wednesday – Goliath by Scott Westerfeld

Reviews
THE POISONED HOUSE by Michael Ford
3/5 stars
Gothic Reading Challenge
Mystery & Suspense Challenge

Challenges
Reading Challenge Check-In

Enjoy your weekend everybody!

Amazingly beautiful and painstakingly crafted signature courtesy of Small Review